Flowers (Sunday B. Morning)

$2,800.00

Flowers (Sunday B. Morning). Original color silkscreen, unknown year. On verso “Fill in Your Signature” stamp. These prints are made from reproductions of Warhol’s original silkscreens from 1967. They are printed on museum board with high quality archival inks just like the originals. These Sunday B Morning prints are produced with the same quality and integrity as Warhol’s original Marilyn screenprints. The only significant difference is the cost, which means everyone can enjoy a Warhol without breaking the bank.

  • Artist: Andy Warhol
  • Year: unknown
  • Dimensions: 91 x 91 cm cm
  • Published by: Sunday B Morning

Description

Flowers (Sunday B. Morning). Original color silkscreen, unknown year. On verso “Fill in Your Signature” stamp. These prints are made from reproductions of Warhol’s original silkscreens from 1967. They are printed on museum board with high quality archival inks just like the originals. These Sunday B Morning prints are produced with the same quality and integrity as Warhol’s original Marilyn screenprints. The only significant difference is the cost, which means everyone can enjoy a Warhol without breaking the bank.
Andy Warhol was born Andrew Warhola in 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Julia and Andrej Warhola, Russian immigrants from Slovakia. In 1945 he attended a commercial design course at Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University). After he graduated in 1949 he moved to New York and established himself as an advertisement illustrator for advertisements, at magazines such as Vogue and Glamour. While producing a series of illustrations for shoes, the printers accidentally left out the final A from his surname in the credits. He then officially changed his name to Andy Warhol in 1950. After a decade long career, he grew tired of commercial illustrations and asked gallery owner Muriel Latow for advice on how to continue his artistic career. She told him to paint what he liked most and things that everyone knows, like money and cans of soup. In the ’60s he was fascinated by a number of American celebrities: Elvis Presley, Elizabeth Taylor and others, depicting them with the silkscreen technique. The mysterious death of Marilyn Monroe, with whose tragic death the artist felt he could identify with, inspired him to produce a series of prints, to which he returned in later years. In the mid-’60s he devoted himself to more serious themes, depicting a series of car collisions and other accidents and deaths. In 1963 Warhol moved to his famous study, later known as The Factory, where he created most of his art – the Flower series, self-portraits, sculptures, his own film production… The Factory soon became a center for many “super” celebrities and artists, among others the Velvet Underground band and Nico, Bob Dylan, members of the Rolling Stones, etc. Andy Warhol has a place in the history of art as a versatile artist – a painter, sculptor, filmmaker, photographer, commercial illustrator, music producer, writer and even as a model. In 1996 the Andy Warhol museum was opened in his hometown of Pittsburgh. This is reputed to be the most complete American museum dedicated to a single artist. Feminist activist Valerie Solanas made an assassination attempt on Warhol on July 3rd, 1968 and seriously wounded him with a gunshot to the abdomen, which left him in extremely poor health for the rest of his life. He died after an operation of his gallbladder in 1987.
In 1964 the “Flowers” series became one of the most iconic and successful Warhol’s artworks. Each art piece in this series contains four psychedelic-colored flowers on the green grass with dark outlines. Unlike the artist’s legendary artworks of that period inspired by consumerism, celebrities, death, murders and disasters, the “Flowers” were a real refreshment for the eyes of the audience. Nevertheless, those artworks were a significant departure to the more abstract, and not only in terms of aesthetic character, but also of philosophical concepts. There is tension between natural life and mechanical art – flower as a motif in one hand and silkscreen technique originally intended for commercial use in the other hand. Throughout art history, the flower and its symbolism has been the subject for many renowned artists, and Warhol depicted them through his pop art prism. Instead of having a model from nature, the artist sought inspiration in photography of hibiscus blossoms from a magazine called Modern Photography. There was a featured photography of seven hibiscus flowers taken by the executive editor Patricia Caulfield, which were printed three times to show the color variation of different chemical processes. To create the composition for his paintings, he cropped the photography into a perfect square, manipulating the flowers, so it become a perfect square format composition of four flowers. Caulfield brought a lawsuit against Warhol because of copyright infringement and Warhol lost a lot of money on litigation. It was very strange or even comical that he was charged for copyright infringement by using a simple image of flowers after years of replicating copyrighted product labels like Coca-Cola or Campbell’s soup, which makes this series more pop-artistic then it could be. In 1970s Warhol began collaborating with two friends from Belgium on a second series of prints, with an idea to play on the concept of mass production. These were named “Sunday B Morning” prints and they contained “Marilyn Monroe”, “Flowers”, “Soup Cans”, “Mao” and other series. These prints are recognized as authentic reproductions in “Andy Warhol’s Catalogue Raisonne”, with some of them being signed by Warhol himself using the phrase: “This is not me. Andy Warhol.” A third series was produced in 1985, and another one, after Warhol’s death, in the latte 90s, and they continue to publish, so it is actually unknown how many of these were made. All these prints are stamped with blue ink on the verso with “Fill in your signature” and published by “Sunday B. Morning”. One is for sure, these prints are made from reproductions of Warhol’s original silkscreens from 1967, with the same quality and integrity as Warhol’s original “Flowers” silkscreens. The only difference was that everyone can have one ‘Warhol’ now. His “Flowers” as well as many other works, have achieved fame to the point that they have been constantly reproduced in design and fashion even today.

Additional information

Weight 2.5 kg
Dimensions 100 × 10 cm
Artists

Andy Warhol